Theirs Were The Heavens — Muslim Futurism

City of Mardin, 1577 The old man could still see in the far distance the beautiful constellations that populated the night sky shimmering like strings of white pearls in the soft brightness of dawn. His eyes soon found their target shining faintly in a little corner of the heavens. Awe and wonder took hold of […]

Theirs Were The Heavens — Muslim Futurism

Star Crossed: Part Six

Star Crossed: Part Six

Muslim Futurism

The soft morning light hit the Masjid’s beautiful dome. Bouncing off its reflecting surface made of millions of crystals, the light passed through its towering prism-like minarets, producing a breathtaking display of soft and warm colours encasing the entire structure. It was surrounded by a massive garden dutifully maintained by the botany guild and sectioned off into smaller parcels, each one showcasing a different style of landscaping. The masjid stood at the centre of this lush and intricate maze like a mesmerizing coral gently swimming in a sea of greenery. Four small pavilions were scattered around the garden, embodying various approaches to Valdevian architecture. These ornate buildings provided shelter from the hustle and bustle of the outside world; reserved for quiet contemplation, they were also a productive space for those committed to the memorisation of the Holy Qur’an. The fruit orchard located near the eastern pavilion offered an exceptional view…

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Star Crossed: Part Five

Star Crossed: Part Five

Muslim Futurism

He ran endlessly through the pitch black jungle, leaping effortlessly over the massive detritus of mangled roots littering the forest floor. Using his bio-sonar to navigate the dense wilderness surrounding the Cluster’s outpost, he could hear in the distance the terrifying sounds of the carnivorous creatures that infested the lowlands. Only a few more clicks separated him from his camouflaged jumper. Blowing his own cover to protect another agent was probably the most reckless thing he’s ever done. Running for his life while trying to avoid the Cluster’s acolytes and the ravenous local wildlife was certainly not how he originally planned on ending his mission, but strategy demanded this sacrifice of him.

The grove of old Socoma trees keeping out of sight the clearing where he hid his jumper finally came to view. These giant trees, resembling wooden towers sculpted from obsidian, often grew to unimaginable heights in close proximity. Linking their…

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Star Crossed: Part Four

Star Crossed: Part Four

Muslim Futurism

The Master of the Xinfiniin accompanied by the host, the overseer, and his conscripts approached the rendezvous point. He was increasingly uneasy about this meeting but dared not share his trepidations with anyone. He kept his face as impassive as possible and used his biofeedback abilities to regulate his vital signs and skin temperature in order to project an air of calm. His confident walk betrayed nothing of his desire to launch into a full sprint in the opposite direction, and put as much distance as possible between his ship and this place. The ten conscripts chosen by the overseer to ensure their safety kept a watchful eye as they marched in a tight triangle formation, surrounding the Master and the host, confining them both to the centre. These men’s lives were declared forfeit the moment they enlisted as conscripts to purge their sentences. In the Xininit consortium, serving as…

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Should A Muslim Perspective Matter In Science Fiction?

Should A Muslim Perspective Matter In Science Fiction?

Muslim Futurism

Article originally published by Islamscifi.com

Storytelling has always been an integral part of human traditions. Every story serves as a medium to convey ideas, pass on values and norms, or invite audiences to ponder and reflect. Some of the greatest stories ever told were intended to be a reflection on the world we live in. Both Huxley’s Brave New World, and Hugo’s Les Miserables—although belonging to wildly different genres—are perfect examples of stories examining the human condition with perspicacity and creativity. Science Fiction particularly has produced over the decades stories that allow an incredible level of range and variety, while taking place in an ever shifting and evolving context. This fluidity in storytelling is what makes this genre an interesting vehicle for tackling complex and challenging ideas.

While Muslims are often consumers of science fiction, their impact as producers of new sci-fi material is unfortunately negligible. However, one…

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Star Crossed: Part Three

Star Crossed: Part Three

Muslim Futurism

The hubris of the Children of Quailth, Bolthaar, and Durnah—who in their vanity sought power in the darkest realms of existence—plunged the land into an everlasting cataclysm. From the atramentous towers that housed the custodians of arcane knowledge oozed an evil so profound and primeval that even the land cried out in agony. Soon, their gilded cities were torn asunder. The laments of the old sages of Tsabong did nothing to assuage the impending destruction. Their sorrowful litany resonated in their hollowed sanctuaries as turmoil swallowed what was once the abode of the living.

—The chronicles of the traveler Tuba Saab—

The Xinfiniin flew over the Southern sea, cutting through the tumultuous weather with ease and precision. The builders of Kharnak carved its hull from the highly sought out metals of Tuul, anticipating the perils of its inauspicious voyage. Tefra Koss was a dead world caught in the gravity of…

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Star Crossed: Part Two

Star Crossed: Part Two

Muslim Futurism

Muslim Futurism

“The truth is Commander, this is unchartered territory for all of us. Zaya received a direct blast from a weapon we know virtually nothing about. We know that it affected her neurological system as a whole. But the extent of the damage is something we are still grappling with. While a certain amount of memory loss is to be expected after a brain injury, we cannot explain why she believes she is someone else all together. You’ll have to be patient, and give her time to adjust to her new circumstances.”

Dr. Faysel Tolmen could read the worry, desperation, and frustration dancing on Jorran’s face. He couldn’t help but wonder what devious mind came up with the devastating weapon that almost took Zaya’s life. For twelve years, her husband vacillated between hope and despair, never giving up on the faint chance that she could one day wake up from her…

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